BDSM

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BDSM is a variety of erotic practices involving Domination and Submission, Roleplay, Restraints, Spanking and various other dynamics. Considering the wide range of practices, some of which may be engaged in by people who don't consider themselves as practicing BDSM, inclusion in the BDSM community and/or subculture is usually dependent on self-identification and shared experience. Interest in BDSM can range from one-time experimentation to a lifestyle, and there is debate over whether a BDSM or kink sexual identity also constitutes a form of sexual orientation.

We at Altopedia personally believe that BDSM, Swinging, or any other sexual desire would of course be a sexuality.

The term BDSM can be traced back to 1969, however the origin of the term BDSM is unclear, and is believed to have been formed either from joining the term B&D (Bondage and Discipline) with S & M (Sadomasochism or Sadism and Masochism)

Regardless of its origin, BDSM is used as a catch-all phrase to include a wide range of activities, forms of interpersonal relationships, and distinct subcultures. BDSM communities generally welcome anyone with a non-normative streak who identifies with the community; this may include Cross Dressing, Body Modification, Furrism, fans of Latex or Rubber aficionados, and whatever else anyone can dream of.

Unlike "normal" relationships commonly followed by couples, activities and relationships within a BDSM context are often characterised by the participants' taking on complementary, but not always equal roles; thus, the idea of informed consent of both the partners becomes essential. Participants who exert sexual/non sexual control over their partners are known as Dominants/Dom while participants who take the passive, receiving, or obedient role are known as submissive/Sub. Individuals who alternate between top/dominant and bottom/submissive roles – whether from relationship to relationship or within a given relationship – are known as switches, though the term is occasionally seen as derogatory and is rejected by many who might simplistically fit the definition.

Safety

Aside from the general precautions related to safe sex, BDSM can require extra precautions than "Vanilla Sex" (sexual behavior without BDSM elements). Some suggestions would be;-
Pre-Play Negotiations, these are commonplace, especially among partners who do not know each other very well. In practice, pick-up scenes at clubs or parties may sometimes be low in negotiation (much as pick-up sex from singles bars may not involve much negotiation or disclosure). Ideally, these negotiations concern the interests and fantasies of each partner and establish a framework. Safewords, these are often arranged to provide for an immediate stop of any activity if any participant should so desire. Safewords are, by definition, not commonly used words during any kind of play. Words such as "no", "stop", and "don't", are often not appropriate as a safeword if the roleplaying aspect includes the illusion of non-consent. A safeword ought to be something both parties can remember and call to mind or recognise when things are either not going as planned or have crossed a threshold one cannot handle.