Difference between revisions of "Cherry Poppin' Daddies"

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[[Image:Cherry-Poppin-Daddies-logo.jpg|790px|center|link=https://www.daddies.com]]
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=Intro=
 
=Intro=
 
An American [[Swing]] / [[Ska]] band established out of Eugene, Oregon, in 1989.
 
An American [[Swing]] / [[Ska]] band established out of Eugene, Oregon, in 1989.
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"My conception of punk", Perry told The Rocket, "was doing whatever the hell you wanted as long as it had vitality and wasn't overly stupid ... something exploratory and experimental", citing influence from genre-bending bands such as [[The Clash]] and the Meat Puppets. In their earliest incarnation, "Mr. Wiggles" played [[Punk]]-inflected [[Funk]] and [[Doul]] music, though Perry's songwriting soon grew to draw heavily from a newfound interest in [[Jazz]], [[Swing]] and [[Rhythm and Blues]], combining [[Punk]] [[Rock]] and [[Jazz]] arrangements in what Perry described was a desire to contemporize American roots music by infusing it with [[Punk]] energy and using modernist, socially aware lyricism.
 
"My conception of punk", Perry told The Rocket, "was doing whatever the hell you wanted as long as it had vitality and wasn't overly stupid ... something exploratory and experimental", citing influence from genre-bending bands such as [[The Clash]] and the Meat Puppets. In their earliest incarnation, "Mr. Wiggles" played [[Punk]]-inflected [[Funk]] and [[Doul]] music, though Perry's songwriting soon grew to draw heavily from a newfound interest in [[Jazz]], [[Swing]] and [[Rhythm and Blues]], combining [[Punk]] [[Rock]] and [[Jazz]] arrangements in what Perry described was a desire to contemporize American roots music by infusing it with [[Punk]] energy and using modernist, socially aware lyricism.
 +
 +
==Early Days (1989–1993)==
 +
In early 1989, the banner of Mr. Wiggles was retired when the band switched to the intentionally provocative "Cherry Poppin' Daddies". Derived from a jive phrase Perry had overheard on a vintage race record, the name intended to reflect the group's [[Jazz]] and [[Blues]] influences as well as an edgy [[Punk]] irreverence in the same vein as the Butthole Surfers, though the decision was ultimately made on impulse, as the members had run out of time to figure out a name to put on their posters and doubted their longevity past a handful of shows. The band played their first show as the Cherry Poppin' Daddies at Eugene's W.O.W. Hall on March 31, 1989.
 +
 +
Boasting a horn section, a penchant for outlandish stage theatrics and encouraging their audiences to dance, the Daddies sought to prove themselves the antithesis to the then-current state of Northwest [[Rock]]. As Perry spoke of the Daddies' ideology, ''"It was our way of saying 'screw you' [to alternative rock 'phoniness'] ... we wanted to have fun, outrageously have a good blast without even thinking about it"''. Nonetheless, by the end of 1989, the Daddies had built a strong and loyal following within Eugene's counterculture, frequently selling out shows and gathering critical acclaim, earning praise from Eugene Weekly as being the city's best band "by far".
 +
 +
The Daddies recorded their first demo cassette 4 From On High in July 1989, containing four tracks of [[Funk]] [[Rock]] and [[Punk]]-influenced [[Swing]]. The cassette reportedly sold over 1,000 copies in the Eugene and Portland areas, enabling the band to self-produce their debut LP Ferociously Stoned, which was released the following year. Fusing [[Punk]] [[Rock]] and [[Jazz]] horns with [[Funk]] grooves, Ferociously Stoned drew favorable critical comparisons to contemporaries [[Faith No More]] and the [[Red Hot Chili Peppers]] while also becoming a regional best-seller, setting a record for advance sales in Eugene's record stores and then remaining for over a year on The Rocket's Northwest Top Twenty list, helping expand the Daddies' Northwestern touring reach to as far as Alaska and Los Angeles by 1992.
 +
 +
==Controversies and censorship==
 +
On top of their iconoclastic weave of musical styles, the Daddies became both celebrated and execrated for their notoriously bombastic and salacious stage shows. With the band members donning a rotating array of flamboyant costumes, a typical Daddies performance would feature such antics as go-go dancers, phallic stage scenery, prop-heavy vaudevillian skits or even choreographed dance numbers. Perry — then performing under his mad scientist stage persona of "MC Large Drink" — would regularly engage in absurdist shock rock stunts, such as mock crucifixion and flag burning. The most renowned element of the Daddies' early stage shows, however, was the "Dildorado" (alternately, "The Dildozer"), a penis-shaped modified ride-on lawnmower which mimicked ejaculation by shooting salvos of colorful fluids from its tip.
 +
 +
Almost immediately, the Daddies emerged a controversial presence within Eugene's actively political atmosphere. Feminist groups condemned the band's performances as pornographic, accusing their band name and sexually-charged lyricism as promotion of sexism and misogyny, claims which Perry boldly disputed, defending the controversial elements as misinterpreted satire. In what Eugene Weekly called "the most hotly discussed topic in the local music scene" and "the Eugene flash point for the growing national debate on censorship [and] free speech", the Daddies endured a storm of controversy which nearly ended their burgeoning career. Vigilante protest groups habitually tore down or defaced the band's posters and sought boycotts against venues that would book the group and even newspapers which gave them a positive review. The Daddies' concerts routinely became sites of organized picketing and, on one occasion, a bomb threat.The band members themselves were frequent recipients of hate mail, threats and physical harassment: once, Perry claimed, an irate protester threw a cup of hot coffee in his face as he was walking down the street.
 +
 +
At first, the Daddies refused to change their name on the grounds of artistic freedom, but after venues refused to book them due to the negative publicity which naturally accompanied their shows — including a temporary ban from the W.O.W. Hall, where the Daddies had previously served as house band — the group caved into community pressure, taking to performing under pseudonyms such as "The Daddies", "The Bad Daddies" and similar variations just within Eugene, retaining their full title while traveling abroad. As the Daddies advanced in their career and retired the theatrical elements from their live shows, the controversies surrounding them waned and the band returned to using their full name in Eugene, though some minor complaints resurfaced during their mainstream success in the late 1990s.
 +
 +
==National touring and independent success (1994–1996)==
 +
Throughout the early 1990s, the Daddies continued to remain a reliably popular and profitable draw in the Pacific Northwest and Northern California club circuit. Despite earning critical accolades from the local music press, including winning SF Weekly's title of "Best Unsigned Band" in 1994, the Daddies struggled to achieve wider recognition and distribution. Following a number of changes in their member and managerial line-ups, the group embarked on their first national tour in the fall of 1994, which was highlighted by a set at the CMJ Music Marathon festival and convention in New York City. Upon returning to Eugene without any advantageous deals, the Daddies instead bought and constructed their own independent record label and recording studio, Space Age Bachelor Pad Records, where they self-produced and self-recorded their second studio album, Rapid City Muscle Car, which was released in December 1994. Described by Perry as "an idea album" and "very psychedelic", Rapid City Muscle Car was a distinct departure from the upbeat dance music vibe of Ferociously Stoned, showcasing a diverse range of disparate genres including [[Ska Punk]], [[Psychedelic Rock]], [[Country]], [[Rockabilly]], [[Big Band]], Hard Rock and Lounge. While Perry has retrospectively cited Rapid City Muscle Car as his personal favorite Daddies album, he revealed in a 1995 interview with the Los Angeles Times that the album sold "okay" but ultimately didn't surpass the success of Ferociously Stoned.
 +
 +
The Daddies began dedicating themselves to full-time touring in 1995, playing over 200 shows across two or three national tours per year, including spots at prominent music festivals such as South by Southwest in Austin, Texas. As the band gradually built fanbases and markets around the country, they finally started attracting interest from numerous high-profile record labels and producers, among which reportedly included Hollywood Records, Roy Thomas Baker and Terry Ellis. However, when the suggestion or stipulation was made that the Daddies stick to one genre, Perry invariably rejected these offers, not wanting any outside influences controlling the band's sound. In a similar mindset, not wishing to be pigeon-holed into any specific scene or genre, Perry at first refused to tour with [[Ska]] bands, though after a highly successful and well-received tour with Fresno [[Ska]] band Let's Go Bowling, he acquiesced, and the Daddies eventually carved out a lucrative niche within the national [[Ska]] scene, forming regular touring partnerships with the likes of [[The Mighty Mighty Bosstones]], [[Reel Big Fish]] and [[Less Than Jake]].
 +
 +
While the mainstream's growing focus on [[Punk]] and [[Ska]] by the mid-1990s presented the Daddies with further commercial opportunities, Perry still insisted foremost on maintaining complete creative control of the band. In February 1996, the Daddies released their third self-produced studio album on Space Age Bachelor Pad, Kids on the Street. Another musical departure from their previous record, Kids on the Street was mostly a reflection of the band's growing [[Punk]] and [[Ska]] influences, eschewing the Daddies' trademark brassy funk and swing in favor of guitar-driven [[Rock]], [[Punk]] and [[Ska]], as well as stylistic detours into [[Jazz]] and [[Country]]. Distributed by noted indie label Caroline Records, Kids on the Street wound up becoming the Daddies' most successful release at the time, staying on The Rocket's Retail Sales Top Twenty for over seven months and even working its way onto Rolling Stone's Alternative Charts.
 +
 +
==Zoot Suit Riot and major label times (1997–1999)==
 +
By late 1996, [[Ska]] had broken through into the American mainstream as one of the most popular forms of alternative music, catapulting such major label bands as [[Reel Big Fish]] and [[The Mighty Mighty Bosstones]] into the national spotlight. The Daddies, however, without the support of a record label, were ultimately left on the fringes of commercial visibility. Although Kids on the Street had sold well for an independent release, the band had continuing difficulty securing press and distribution outside of the Northwest, while the pressure of full-time touring was inevitably becoming both a personal and financial strain on the members. The Daddies experienced at least fifteen line-up changes from 1996 to 1997, including the departure of original keyboardist Chris Azorr and co-founder Dan Schmid, leaving only Perry and trumpeter Dana Heitman as the sole remnants of the original line-up. Feeling they had finally hit a glass ceiling as an independent band, Perry said the Daddies were left with one of two options at this time: either sign to a label or break up.
 +
 +
Despite primarily playing [[Ska]] tours during this turbulent period of their career, the Daddies suddenly began attracting a sizable and enthusiastic audience for their [[Swing]] music, owing heavily to the coincident public interest in the formerly underground [[Swing]] revival movement due in part to the success of the 1996 film [https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0117802/ Swingers]. Although the Daddies had occasionally played shows with notable [[Swing]] revival bands like Royal Crown Revue, they were not largely associated with the scene or subculture; when fans regularly began approaching the band's merchandise table asking which of their albums contained the most swing songs, the Daddies realized they lacked an album fully representing their [[Swing]] side, prompting the band's manager to convince them to compile all of their [[Swing]] songs onto one CD until they could afford to make a new album, using their available finances to record several bonus tracks for inclusion. The result, Zoot Suit Riot: The Swingin' Hits of the Cherry Poppin' Daddies, became an unexpectedly popular item as the band went on tour, reportedly selling as many as 4,000 copies a week through their Northwest distributors.
 +
 +
While stopped in Los Angeles during another tour together, [[Reel Big Fish]] arranged a meeting between their label Mojo Records and the Daddies in the hopes of helping the band obtain a distribution deal for Zoot Suit Riot. Following negotiations between Perry and Mojo, however, the label instead signed the Daddies to a two-album recording contract. Zoot Suit Riot was licensed and reissued by Mojo and given national distribution in July 1997, less than four months after its original release.
  
 
=Albums List=
 
=Albums List=

Revision as of 00:57, 29 July 2020

Cherry-Poppin-Daddies-logo.jpg

Intro

An American Swing / Ska band established out of Eugene, Oregon, in 1989.

They were formed by singer-songwriter Steve Perry and bassist Dan Schmid, the band has experienced numerous personnel changes over the course of their thirty year career, with only Perry, Schmid and trumpeter Dana Heitman currently remaining from the original founding line-up.

Info

Following his high school graduation in 1981, Steve Perry left his hometown of Binghamton, New York, for Eugene, Oregon, to pursue track and field and a chemistry degree at the University of Oregon.

A Punk Rock devotee since adolescence, Perry soon became engrossed in Eugene's underground music scene, where he eventually met and befriended musician and fellow University student Dan Schmid. Sharing similar musical ambitions and a mutual disinterest in school, the pair agreed to drop out of college together and start a band, forming the Punk trio "The Jazz Greats" in 1983, which evolved into the Paisley Underground-styled garage rock group Saint Huck, which lasted from 1984 to 1987

As the rise of Grunge began to phase Punk and Hardcore out of the Northwest underground by the late 1980s, Perry set out to start a band that stood in defiant contrast to the shoegazing attitude of Alternative Rock, showcasing high energy dance music and Zappa-esque theatricality in an attempt to create something that an audience would react to viscerally instead of passively.

Recruiting a horn section led by alto saxophonist Brooks Brown, Perry and Schmid formed their latest band "Mr. Wiggles" – named so after a Parliament song – in November 1988, playing their first show in Springfield as part of a benefit concert for workers of the Nicolai door manufacturing plant, who were then engaged in a union strike.

"My conception of punk", Perry told The Rocket, "was doing whatever the hell you wanted as long as it had vitality and wasn't overly stupid ... something exploratory and experimental", citing influence from genre-bending bands such as The Clash and the Meat Puppets. In their earliest incarnation, "Mr. Wiggles" played Punk-inflected Funk and Doul music, though Perry's songwriting soon grew to draw heavily from a newfound interest in Jazz, Swing and Rhythm and Blues, combining Punk Rock and Jazz arrangements in what Perry described was a desire to contemporize American roots music by infusing it with Punk energy and using modernist, socially aware lyricism.

Early Days (1989–1993)

In early 1989, the banner of Mr. Wiggles was retired when the band switched to the intentionally provocative "Cherry Poppin' Daddies". Derived from a jive phrase Perry had overheard on a vintage race record, the name intended to reflect the group's Jazz and Blues influences as well as an edgy Punk irreverence in the same vein as the Butthole Surfers, though the decision was ultimately made on impulse, as the members had run out of time to figure out a name to put on their posters and doubted their longevity past a handful of shows. The band played their first show as the Cherry Poppin' Daddies at Eugene's W.O.W. Hall on March 31, 1989.

Boasting a horn section, a penchant for outlandish stage theatrics and encouraging their audiences to dance, the Daddies sought to prove themselves the antithesis to the then-current state of Northwest Rock. As Perry spoke of the Daddies' ideology, "It was our way of saying 'screw you' [to alternative rock 'phoniness'] ... we wanted to have fun, outrageously have a good blast without even thinking about it". Nonetheless, by the end of 1989, the Daddies had built a strong and loyal following within Eugene's counterculture, frequently selling out shows and gathering critical acclaim, earning praise from Eugene Weekly as being the city's best band "by far".

The Daddies recorded their first demo cassette 4 From On High in July 1989, containing four tracks of Funk Rock and Punk-influenced Swing. The cassette reportedly sold over 1,000 copies in the Eugene and Portland areas, enabling the band to self-produce their debut LP Ferociously Stoned, which was released the following year. Fusing Punk Rock and Jazz horns with Funk grooves, Ferociously Stoned drew favorable critical comparisons to contemporaries Faith No More and the Red Hot Chili Peppers while also becoming a regional best-seller, setting a record for advance sales in Eugene's record stores and then remaining for over a year on The Rocket's Northwest Top Twenty list, helping expand the Daddies' Northwestern touring reach to as far as Alaska and Los Angeles by 1992.

Controversies and censorship

On top of their iconoclastic weave of musical styles, the Daddies became both celebrated and execrated for their notoriously bombastic and salacious stage shows. With the band members donning a rotating array of flamboyant costumes, a typical Daddies performance would feature such antics as go-go dancers, phallic stage scenery, prop-heavy vaudevillian skits or even choreographed dance numbers. Perry — then performing under his mad scientist stage persona of "MC Large Drink" — would regularly engage in absurdist shock rock stunts, such as mock crucifixion and flag burning. The most renowned element of the Daddies' early stage shows, however, was the "Dildorado" (alternately, "The Dildozer"), a penis-shaped modified ride-on lawnmower which mimicked ejaculation by shooting salvos of colorful fluids from its tip.

Almost immediately, the Daddies emerged a controversial presence within Eugene's actively political atmosphere. Feminist groups condemned the band's performances as pornographic, accusing their band name and sexually-charged lyricism as promotion of sexism and misogyny, claims which Perry boldly disputed, defending the controversial elements as misinterpreted satire. In what Eugene Weekly called "the most hotly discussed topic in the local music scene" and "the Eugene flash point for the growing national debate on censorship [and] free speech", the Daddies endured a storm of controversy which nearly ended their burgeoning career. Vigilante protest groups habitually tore down or defaced the band's posters and sought boycotts against venues that would book the group and even newspapers which gave them a positive review. The Daddies' concerts routinely became sites of organized picketing and, on one occasion, a bomb threat.The band members themselves were frequent recipients of hate mail, threats and physical harassment: once, Perry claimed, an irate protester threw a cup of hot coffee in his face as he was walking down the street.

At first, the Daddies refused to change their name on the grounds of artistic freedom, but after venues refused to book them due to the negative publicity which naturally accompanied their shows — including a temporary ban from the W.O.W. Hall, where the Daddies had previously served as house band — the group caved into community pressure, taking to performing under pseudonyms such as "The Daddies", "The Bad Daddies" and similar variations just within Eugene, retaining their full title while traveling abroad. As the Daddies advanced in their career and retired the theatrical elements from their live shows, the controversies surrounding them waned and the band returned to using their full name in Eugene, though some minor complaints resurfaced during their mainstream success in the late 1990s.

National touring and independent success (1994–1996)

Throughout the early 1990s, the Daddies continued to remain a reliably popular and profitable draw in the Pacific Northwest and Northern California club circuit. Despite earning critical accolades from the local music press, including winning SF Weekly's title of "Best Unsigned Band" in 1994, the Daddies struggled to achieve wider recognition and distribution. Following a number of changes in their member and managerial line-ups, the group embarked on their first national tour in the fall of 1994, which was highlighted by a set at the CMJ Music Marathon festival and convention in New York City. Upon returning to Eugene without any advantageous deals, the Daddies instead bought and constructed their own independent record label and recording studio, Space Age Bachelor Pad Records, where they self-produced and self-recorded their second studio album, Rapid City Muscle Car, which was released in December 1994. Described by Perry as "an idea album" and "very psychedelic", Rapid City Muscle Car was a distinct departure from the upbeat dance music vibe of Ferociously Stoned, showcasing a diverse range of disparate genres including Ska Punk, Psychedelic Rock, Country, Rockabilly, Big Band, Hard Rock and Lounge. While Perry has retrospectively cited Rapid City Muscle Car as his personal favorite Daddies album, he revealed in a 1995 interview with the Los Angeles Times that the album sold "okay" but ultimately didn't surpass the success of Ferociously Stoned.

The Daddies began dedicating themselves to full-time touring in 1995, playing over 200 shows across two or three national tours per year, including spots at prominent music festivals such as South by Southwest in Austin, Texas. As the band gradually built fanbases and markets around the country, they finally started attracting interest from numerous high-profile record labels and producers, among which reportedly included Hollywood Records, Roy Thomas Baker and Terry Ellis. However, when the suggestion or stipulation was made that the Daddies stick to one genre, Perry invariably rejected these offers, not wanting any outside influences controlling the band's sound. In a similar mindset, not wishing to be pigeon-holed into any specific scene or genre, Perry at first refused to tour with Ska bands, though after a highly successful and well-received tour with Fresno Ska band Let's Go Bowling, he acquiesced, and the Daddies eventually carved out a lucrative niche within the national Ska scene, forming regular touring partnerships with the likes of The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, Reel Big Fish and Less Than Jake.

While the mainstream's growing focus on Punk and Ska by the mid-1990s presented the Daddies with further commercial opportunities, Perry still insisted foremost on maintaining complete creative control of the band. In February 1996, the Daddies released their third self-produced studio album on Space Age Bachelor Pad, Kids on the Street. Another musical departure from their previous record, Kids on the Street was mostly a reflection of the band's growing Punk and Ska influences, eschewing the Daddies' trademark brassy funk and swing in favor of guitar-driven Rock, Punk and Ska, as well as stylistic detours into Jazz and Country. Distributed by noted indie label Caroline Records, Kids on the Street wound up becoming the Daddies' most successful release at the time, staying on The Rocket's Retail Sales Top Twenty for over seven months and even working its way onto Rolling Stone's Alternative Charts.

Zoot Suit Riot and major label times (1997–1999)

By late 1996, Ska had broken through into the American mainstream as one of the most popular forms of alternative music, catapulting such major label bands as Reel Big Fish and The Mighty Mighty Bosstones into the national spotlight. The Daddies, however, without the support of a record label, were ultimately left on the fringes of commercial visibility. Although Kids on the Street had sold well for an independent release, the band had continuing difficulty securing press and distribution outside of the Northwest, while the pressure of full-time touring was inevitably becoming both a personal and financial strain on the members. The Daddies experienced at least fifteen line-up changes from 1996 to 1997, including the departure of original keyboardist Chris Azorr and co-founder Dan Schmid, leaving only Perry and trumpeter Dana Heitman as the sole remnants of the original line-up. Feeling they had finally hit a glass ceiling as an independent band, Perry said the Daddies were left with one of two options at this time: either sign to a label or break up.

Despite primarily playing Ska tours during this turbulent period of their career, the Daddies suddenly began attracting a sizable and enthusiastic audience for their Swing music, owing heavily to the coincident public interest in the formerly underground Swing revival movement due in part to the success of the 1996 film Swingers. Although the Daddies had occasionally played shows with notable Swing revival bands like Royal Crown Revue, they were not largely associated with the scene or subculture; when fans regularly began approaching the band's merchandise table asking which of their albums contained the most swing songs, the Daddies realized they lacked an album fully representing their Swing side, prompting the band's manager to convince them to compile all of their Swing songs onto one CD until they could afford to make a new album, using their available finances to record several bonus tracks for inclusion. The result, Zoot Suit Riot: The Swingin' Hits of the Cherry Poppin' Daddies, became an unexpectedly popular item as the band went on tour, reportedly selling as many as 4,000 copies a week through their Northwest distributors.

While stopped in Los Angeles during another tour together, Reel Big Fish arranged a meeting between their label Mojo Records and the Daddies in the hopes of helping the band obtain a distribution deal for Zoot Suit Riot. Following negotiations between Perry and Mojo, however, the label instead signed the Daddies to a two-album recording contract. Zoot Suit Riot was licensed and reissued by Mojo and given national distribution in July 1997, less than four months after its original release.

Albums List

Ferociously Stoned (1990)

Rapid City Muscle Car (1994)

Kids on the Street (1996)

Soul Caddy (2000)

Susquehanna (2008)

White Teeth, Black Thoughts (2013)

Please Return the Evening (2014)

The Boop-A-Doo (2016)

Bigger Life (2019)

Members Name Check

  • Steve Perry (MC Large Drink) – lead vocals, rhythm guitar (1989–present)
  • Dan Schmid (Dang Oulette) – bass (1989–1996, 1998–present)
  • Dana Heitman – trumpet (1989–present)
  • Willie Matheis – tenor saxophone, bari saxophone (2010–present)
  • Zak Johnson – lead guitar, banjo, backing vocals (2015–present)
  • Josh Hettwer – alto saxophone (2016–present)
  • Matt Hettwer – trombone, keyboards (2019–present)

Former Members

  • Tim Arnold – drums (1989-1990)
  • James Gossard – lead guitar (1989–1990)
  • John Fohl – lead guitar (1990–1992)
  • James Phillips – tenor saxophone (1989–1992, 1996) (deceased, 1961–2011)
  • Brooks Brown – alto saxophone (1989–1994)
  • Adrian P. Baxter – tenor saxophone (1993–1996)
  • Adam Glogauer – drums (1996)
  • Sean Oldham – drums (1996)
  • Jason Palmer – drums (1996) (2009 – studio recordings)
  • Brian West – drums (1990–1996) (deceased, 1966 – 2018)
  • Chris Azorr – keyboards (1990–1997)
  • Rex Trimm – alto saxophone (1996–1997)
  • Hans Wagner – drums (1996–1997)
  • Naiya Cominos – bass (1995–1996)
  • Darren Cassidy – bass (1996–1998)
  • Johnny Goetchius – keyboards (1998–2000)
  • Ian Early – alto saxophone (1997–2006)
  • Tim Donahue – drums (1997–2008)
  • Sean Flannery – tenor saxophone (1996–2008)
  • Jesse Cloninger – tenor saxophone (2008–2010)
  • Jason Moss – guitar (1992–2010)
  • Dustin Lanker – keyboards, backing vocals (1997–1998, 2000–2012)
  • Kevin Congleton – drums (2008–2013)
  • Joe Manis – alto and baritone saxophones (2006–2013)
  • William Seiji Marsh – lead guitar, backing vocals (2010–2014)
  • Chris Ward – lead guitar, banjo, backing vocals (2014–2015)
  • Paul Owen – drums (2013–2017)
  • Andy Page – alto saxophone, clarinet (2013–2019)
  • Joe Freuen – trombone (2012–2019)

External Links

The Official Website

Facebook Page

All Music