Intelligent Dance Music

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Generally people would refer to this genre as "IDM".

Fundamentally, it would be a sub genre of Electronic Dance Music that emerged during the early 1990s and was characterised by an experimental or "cerebral" sound often intended for home listening rather than dancing.

Intro

It was initially influenced by a wide variety of sources, including developments in underground dance music such as Detroit Techno and UK Breakbeat as well styles that included - Electronica, Techno, Ambient, Ambient House, Ambient Techno, Acid House, Rave, Hip Hop, Breakbeat, Industrial, Krautrock, Jungle, Avant-Garde, EBM, and other forms of electronic music.

Stylistically, IDM tended to rely upon individualistic experimentation rather than adhering to characteristics associated with specific genres.

Prominent artists associated with the genre include Aphex Twin, The Black Dog, The Orb, Autechre, Luke Vibert, Leftfield Squarepusher, and Boards of Canada.

Differing Opinions

The term "Intelligent Dance Music" has been widely criticised and rejected by so-labeled artists as derogatory towards other styles.

The term is said to have originated in the US in 1993 with the formation of the "IDM list", an electronic mailing list originally chartered for the discussion of a number of prominent English artists appearing on the 1992 Warp compilation Artificial Intelligence.

In 2014, music critic Sasha Frere-Jones observed that the term "is widely reviled but still commonly used".

History & Info

Ambient Techno

In the late 1980s, riding the wave of the Acid House and early Rave party scenes, UK-based artists such as The Orb and The KLF produced Ambient House, a genre that fused House music (particularly Acid House) with Ambient music.

The term Ambient House was often indiscriminately applied to any of that era's Electronic Dance Music regarded as suitable for listening, not just dancing, and the term soon fell out of favor as a plethora of new genre names arose.

A parallel progression occurred in Techno music, with artists such as the UK's Aphex Twin and Japan's Tetsu Inoue producing what the press called "Ambient Techno", combining the melodic & rhythmic elements of dancefloor-oriented Techno with elements of Ambient and other experimental music.

By the early 1990s, the increasingly distinct music associated with this experimentation had gained prominence with releases on a variety of mostly UK-based record labels, including Warp (1989), Black Dog Productions (1989), R&S Records (1989), Carl Craig's Planet E, Rising High Records (1991), Richard James's Rephlex Records (1991), Kirk Degiorgio's Applied Rhythmic Technology (1991), Eevo Lute Muzique (1991), General Production Recordings (1989), Soma Quality Recordings (1991), Peacefrog Records (1991), and Metamorphic Recordings (1992).

Intelligent Techno and Electronica

In 1992, Warp released Artificial Intelligence, the first album in the Artificial Intelligence series. Subtitled "electronic listening music from Warp", the record was a collection of tracks from artists such as Autechre, B12, The Black Dog, Aphex Twin and The Orb, under various aliases. Steve Beckett, co-owner of Warp, has said the electronic music that the label was releasing then was targeting a post-club, home-listening audience.

Following the success of the Artificial Intelligence series, "Intelligent Techno" became the favored term, although Ambient without a qualifying House or Techno suffix, but still referring to a hybrid form—was a common synonym.

In the same period (1992–93), other names were also used, such as "art techno," "armchair techno," and "electronica", but all were attempts to describe an emerging offshoot of Electronic Dance Music that was being enjoyed by the "sedentary and stay at home".

At the same time, the UK market was saturated with increasingly frenetic Breakbeat and sample-laden Hardcore Techno records that quickly became formulaic. Rave had become a "dirty word," so as an alternative, it was common for London nightclubs to advertise that they were playing "intelligent" or "pure" Techno, appealing to a "discerning" crowd that considered the Hardcore sound to be too "commercial'.

In 1993, a number of new "Intelligent Techno"/"Electronica" record labels emerged, including New Electronica, Mille Plateaux, 100% Pure, and Ferox Records.

The IDM List

In November 1991, the phrase "intelligent techno" appeared on Usenet in reference to Coil's The Snow EP. Off the Internet, the same phrase appeared in both the U.S. & UK music press in late 1992, in reference to Jam & Spoon's Tales from a Danceographic Ocean and the music of The Future Sound of London. Another instance of the phrase appeared on Usenet in April 1993 in reference to The Black Dog's album Bytes, and in July 1993, in his review of an ethno-dance compilation for NME, Ben Willmott replaced Techno with dance music, writing "...current 'intelligent' dance music owes much more to Eastern mantra-like repetition and neo-ambient instrumentation than the disco era which preceded the advent of acid and techno."

Wider public use of such terms on the Internet came in August 1993, when Alan Parry announced the existence of a new electronic mailing list for discussion of "intelligent" dance music: the "Intelligent Dance Music list", or "IDM List" for short.

The first message, sent on 1 August 1993, was entitled "Can Dumb People Enjoy IDM, Too?". A reply from the list server's system administrator, Brian Behlendorf, revealed that Parry originally wanted to create a list devoted to discussion of the music on the Rephlex label, but they decided together to expand its charter to include music similar to what was on Rephlex or that was in different genres but which had been made with similar approaches. They picked the word "intelligent" because it had already appeared on Artificial Intelligence and because it connoted being something beyond just music for dancing, while still being open to interpretation.

Artists that appeared in the first discussions on the list included Autechre, Atom Heart, LFO and Rephlex Records artists such as Aphex Twin, μ-Ziq and Luke Vibert; plus artists such as The Orb, Richard H. Kirk and The Future Sound of London, and even artists like System 7, William Orbit, Sabres of Paradise, Orbital, Plastikman and Björk. By the end of 1996, Boards of Canada and the Schematic Records label were among the usual topics of discussion, alongside perennial favorites like Aphex Twin and the Warp repertoire.

As of 2015, the mailing list is still active.

IDM Worldwide

In the mid-1990s, North American audiences welcomed IDM, and many IDM record labels were founded, including Drop Beat, Isophlux, Suction, Schematic and Cytrax. In Miami, Florida, labels like Schematic, Merck Records, Nophi Recordings and The Beta Bodega Coalition released material by artists such as Phoenecia, Dino Felipe, Machinedrum and Proem. Another burgeoning scene was the Chicago/Milwaukee area, with labels such as Addict, Chocolate Industries, Hefty and Zod supporting artists like Doormouse, TRS-80 and Emotional Joystick. Tigerbeat 6, a San Francisco-based label has released IDM from artists such as Cex, Kid 606 and Kevin Blechdom.

Contemporary IDM artists include Team Doyobi, Himuro Yoshiteru, Kettel, Ochre, Marumari, Benn Jordan, Proem, Lackluster, Arovane, Ulrich Schnauss, East India Youth, C418 and Wisp, among many others.

IDM Artists

This list could also include a countless amount of remixes from artists who would generally be included within the genres of -

Industrial, or Krautrock, some Indie bands, lots of the Avant-Garde scene, plenty of EBM artists, even a lot of Gothic artists were responsible for IDM remixes.

Numbers

808 State

A

Acustic

The Algorithm

Ellen Allien

The Alpha Conspiracy

Aphex Twin

Apoptygma Berzerk

Apparat

Arovane

Autechre

B

B12

Baths

Beaumont Hannant

Bibio

Björk

The Black Dog

Kevin Blechdom

Boards of Canada

Bochum Welt

Bola

Boyd Rice

Brothomstates

BT

Burial

C

C418

Cabaret Voltaire

Carbon Based Lifeforms

Capitol K

Caribou

Casino Versus Japan

centrozoon

CEvin Key

Cex

Chemical Brothers

Chemlab

Chris Clark

Clock DVA

Coil

Combichrist

CoH

Covenant

Cubanate

Culture Kultur

Curse of the Golden Vampire

Cylob

D

Dabrye

Daedelus

Corvin Dalek

Das Ich

dDamage

Delerium

Depeche Mode

Deutsch-Amerikanische Freundschaft aka DAF

Richard Devine

Diagram of Suburban Chaos

Dj Scot Project

Chris Douglas

Dntel

Doormouse

Download

E

East India Youth

EdIT

Eight Frozen Modules

Emotional Joystick

Empirion

Enduser

Esem

Tim Exile

F

Nathan Fake

Faultline

Fennesz

Fixmer/McCarthy

The Flashbulb

Fluke

Flying Lotus

Four Tet

Freescha

Front 242

Front Line Assembly

Funker Vogt

Funkstörung

The Future Sound of London

G

Gas 0095

The Gaslamp Killer

Gescom

Gold Panda

Gridlock

H

Haujobb

Himuro Yoshiteru

Kim Hiorthøy

Hocico

James Holden

Jon Hopkins

Hypetraxx

I

Icon of Coil

Innovaders

Isan

J

Jackson and his Computer Band

Jamie xx

Jega

Jon The Dentist

Jokers of the Scene

Benn Jordan

K

Keston and Westdal

Kettel

Kevin Martin / The Bug

Khonnor

Kid606

Christian Kleine

KLF

KLOQ

Kraftwerk

Jesper Kyd

L

Lackluster

Lamb

Lapalux

Last Step

Bill Laswell

Lemon Jelly

Leftfield

J Lesser

Little Nobody

Lone

Lorn

Lusine ICL

M

Machinedrum

Marumari

Massiv in Mensch

Matmos

Taylor McFerrin

Meat Beat Manifesto

Mick Harris

Microstoria

Moderat

Modeselektor

Monolake

Mount Kimbie

Mouse on Mars

Mux Mool

Daniel Myer

N

Neuroticfish

Nosaj Thing

O

Obfusc

Ochre

ohGr

Oneohtrix Point Never

The Orb

William Orbit

Orbital

Organ Donors

Oval

P

Mike Paradinas

Pedro INF

Mauro Picotto

Plaid

Plastikman

PlatEAU

Plone

Pole

Pop Will Eat Itself

Prefuse73

The Prodigy

Proem

Protofuse

R

Bogdan Raczynski

Richard H. Kirk

Rotersand

Röyksopp

S

Sabres of Paradise

Samantha Fu

Samarah

SBTRKT

Ulrich Schnauss

Scorn

Sheep On Drugs

Soman

Sun Project

Suns of Arqa

Secret Mommy

Seekae

Mike Sheridan

Shpongle

Raoul Sinier

Skylab

Solar Fields

Solvent

Squarepusher

Stendeck

Syndrone

System 7

T

Nobukazu Takemura

Team Doyobi

Techno Animal

Teebs

Telefon Tel Aviv

David Tipper

To Rococo Rot

Amon Tobin

TOKiMONSTA

TRS-80

Turbulent Soundscape

The Tuss

Two Lone Swordsmen

Tycho

Tyske Ludder

U

Underworld

μ-Ziq

V

Vector Lovers

Veell

Venetian Snares

Luke Vibert

VNV Nation

Vulva

W

Wisp

X

X-Rx

Xela

XPQ-21

Y

Yellow Magic Orchestra

Thom Yorke

Yppah

Z

Zero 7

Zodiac Youth

Zoon van snooK